Posterboard

  1. May
    10
    Saturday: 11:00 am – 6:00 pm

    John Milleker

    The Clara Barton Missing Soldiers Office will host a special program on Civil War Era wet-plate photography on Saturday and Sunday, May 10-11, 2014. As part of the special exhibit, “Bringing the Story of War to Our Doorsteps: Rediscovering Alexander Gardner’s Antietam Photographs,” wet-plate photographer John Milleker will be in residence demonstrating the fascinating and often misunderstood collodion process used by Matthew Brady, Alexander Gardner, and other Civil War photographers.

     

    Mr. Milleker will be in the historic space of the Missing Soldiers Office from 11:00 AM to 6:00 PM both days, demonstrating the same photographic processes that produced Alexander Gardner’s original images of the battlefield dead in 1862. Mr. Milleker and his assistants will give scheduled demonstrations each day at 11:30AM, 1:30 PM, and 3:30 PM, with additional demonstrations possible as visitors may gather. This program will be a rare opportunity for residents and visitors of Washington to witness Civil War Era photography first-hand.

     John M

    This special wet-plate photography program is free with paid admission to the Clara Barton Missing Soldiers Office. If visitors wish, they may have an authentic wet-plate tintype or ambrotype (glass plate) photograph made of themselves for a cost of $40. Proceeds from the sale of these historically correct photographs will benefit the museum.

    For more information please contact Kyle Wichtendahl at 301-695-1864 ex. 1013 or kyle.wichtendahl@civilwarmed.org.

  2. May
    15
    Thursday: 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm
    Join members of the Frederick County Civil War Roundtable for an evening lecture. Mike Sipes will portray Lt.Gen.Jubal Early, the Confederate commander at the battle of Monocacy. The meetings are free and open to the public, they occur on the third Thursday of the month. For more information contact Jack Sheriff at jbsheriff1@comcast.net or visit http://frederickcountycivilwarrt.org/index.html.
  3. May
    17
    Saturday: 11:00 am – 2:00 pm

      

    Join the Pry House staff and volunteers plant new additions to the medicinal and kitchen garden.  Grab your gloves and shovels and dress accordingly. Don’t want to get dirty? Stop by and learn more about the different plants and how they were used during the Civil War. Light refreshments will be served. The event is rain or shine, however it will be cancelled in the event of lightning or very heavy rains. 
  4. May
    22
    Thursday: 11:00 am – 2:00 pm
    Join the students from the surrounding area and the National Museum of Civil War Medicine staff as living historians throw out the first pitch at History Days. This is a ticketed event. For more information please contact the Keys box office 301-662-0013.
  5. Jun
    3
    Tuesday: 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm

    Join us every Thursday evening in July at the National Museum of Civil War Medicine for presentations on a variety of Civil War topics.  This evening, Mr. Joe Collins will present on the little-known battle of West Frederick, which occurred on July 7, 1864. The battle was a precursor to the larger Battle of Monocacy, which occurred on July 9, 1864. Admission is free.

    The Summer Evening Lecture Series are free and open to the public. 
  6. Jun
    7
    Saturday: 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

     M-soldier nine patch

    Textile historian Mavis Slawson will discuss how quilts were important to Civil War soldiers in many ways, used for camping in the field, as saddle blankets, tablecloths, and myriad other purposes.  At the time of the Civil War, “quilt” was used as a term for almost any bed covering, but making true quilts involved much time and work.  In the first year of the Civil War, more than one million men answered the call to arms. Sewing women also responded to this call.  Mrs. Slawson will discuss what happened to their quilts and also how injured soldiers created quilts for themselves while in hospitals.

  7. Jun
    20
    Friday: Jun 20 – Jun 22 (all day)

     

    2014 Antietam Early Banjo Gathering (AEBG-VII)

    At the National Museum of Civil War Medicine’s

    Pry House Field Hospital Museum

    On Antietam National Battlefield

     

    In Partnership with

    The Baltimore Museum of Industry

     

    June 20-22, 2014

     

    The National Museum of Civil War Medicine is proud to present the Seventh Antietam Early Banjo Gathering (AEBG-VII), the premier event for enthusiasts and scholars of the 19th-century banjo music and culture. The conference raises awareness of the early banjo’s significance in the development of American popular culture and underscores music’s importance in the lives of Civil War Americans. The event is a unique forum for both experts and novices to meet and share knowledge, playing technique, and research. Each year brings together dozens of researchers, collectors, musicians, and instrument builders from across the nation to participate in workshops, jam sessions, and scholarly lectures.

    This year the NMCWM is partnering with the Baltimore Museum of Industry (BMI) to present programming at two locations. On Friday, June 20, the BMI will host the first day of events in Baltimore, Maryland to showcase its latest exhibit, “Making Music: The Banjo in Baltimore and Beyond.” On Saturday and Sunday, June 21-22, the event will resume at its traditional location at the Pry House Field Hospital Museum on Antietam National Battlefield.

     

    FRIDAY AT THE BMI: Free and open to the public for the first 80 people to RSVP with BMI

    The BMI’s special exhibit, “Making Music: The Banjo in Baltimore and Beyond,” showcases the banjo as a Maryland tradition since at least the late 1740s and how Baltimore became the setting for the instrument’s earliest mass production in the 1840s. Through the cultural convergences slavery, blackface minstrelsy, and industry, this exhibit reveals the Chesapeake region’s multicultural impact on the foundations of American popular culture. Thus, the BMI is a perfect partner for this year’s Antietam Early Banjo Gathering.

    Friday’s events will include presentations by scholars in the banjo’s musical and cultural heritage, including the special exhibit’s guest curators, Greg Adams, Bob Winans, and Pete Ross. Attendees will receive a private tour of the exhibit from the curators.

    To RSVP for the BMI programming, please contact Kelley Edelmann at kedelmann@thebmi.org. For more information on the Baltimore Museum of Industry and its special exhibit please visit www.thebmi.org.

    SATURDAY & SUNDAY AT ANTIETAM: Registration $70 ($60 for current NMCWM members)

    On Friday evening, AEBG attendees will return to the event’s traditional location at the Pry House Field Hospital Museum on the Antietam National Battlefield in Keedysville, MD, where formal programming will resume on Saturday morning. The Antietam portion of the gathering takes place in and around an 1840s threshing barn, lending an appropriate setting and atmosphere that is both scholarly and casual.

    Scheduled activities will feature diverse program sessions each day. Presenters will talk or demonstrate on a wide range of subjects, including instrument construction, playing techniques, music, history, and other topics closely associated with the early American banjo. The conference’s schedule allows ample time for “jam sessions” and mentoring with some of the nation’s most experienced players.

    Public concerts are held on Saturday and Sunday afternoons. Saturday’s concert is staged in the Pry Barn, while Sunday’s concert takes place at the historic Dunker Church on Antietam Battlefield. Registered AEBG participants are invited to perform in these concerts. While performing is purely voluntary, attendees are encouraged to share and use the opportunity to play publicly with well-respected musicians in these special, historic venues.

    Registered attendees are invited to camp overnight on the Pry House property (Note: registrants must provide their own period or modern tent).

    The cost of registration for the Seventh Antietam Early Banjo Gathering is $70 ($60 for current NMCWM members). Registration includes Saturday and Sunday continental breakfast and lunches, lectures, overnight camping, and admission to the National Museum of Civil War Medicine and the Pry House Field Hospital Museum. Hotel accommodations are available in nearby Hagerstown, MD at a discounted rate for gathering participants.

    To register for the Antietam portions of the Antietam Early Banjo Gathering, please click the link below. To register by phone or for more information, contact Kyle Wichtendahl at kyle.wichtendahl@civilwarmed.org or 301-695-1864 ex 1013.

    Please Note: Registering for the AEBG at the Pry House Field Hospital Museum on Saturday and Sunday does not automatically register you for activities at the BMI on Friday. You must register for both events separately.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Thursday, June 19: Pry House Field Hospital Museum (18906 Shepherdstown Pike, Keedysville, MD 21756)

    • 3:00 p.m. Registration/Check-in opens
    • 4:00 p.m.-? Camping set-up, social time, jamming

     

    FRIDAY, June 20 Baltimore Museum of Industry (1415 Key Highway, Baltimore, Maryland 21230)

     

    SATURDAY, June 21 Pry House Field Hospital Museum 

    • 8:30 a.m.: Check-in, continental breakfast (provided for registered participants only)
    • 9:00-9:45 a.m.: PRESENTATION 5: Skeffington Flynn: Board Member, Rhythm Bones Society
    • 10:30-11:15 a.m.: PRESENTATION 6: Mentoring Breakout Session #1: Joel Hooks (“banjo tricks” basics), Tim Twiss (Kerr’s “Merry Melodies” for the banjo), and Mark Weems (Repertoire from The Music of Old Joe Sweeny)
    • 12:00-1:00 p.m.: Lunch (provided for registered participants)
    • 1:30-2:15 p.m.: PRESENTATION 7:  Junious Brickhouse: Executive Director, Founder, Urban Artistry Inc.
    • 3:00-3:45 p.m.: PRESENTATION 8:  Panel Discussion: Reflections on the BMI Exhibit Making Music: The Banjo in Baltimore & Beyond (a recap of what occurred on Friday June 20—for those who could not attend—and an open discussion about some of the critical issues that shape what we do)
    • 5:15 p.m.: PUBLIC CONCERT at Pry House Field Hospital and Museum
    • 6:30 p.m.: Dinner on your own
    • 6:30 p.m.-?: Jam sessions, social time

     

    SUNDAY, June 22 Pry House Field Hospital Museum

    • 8:30 a.m.: Check-in, continental breakfast (provided for registered participants only)
    • 9:00-9:30 a.m.: Large group meeting about AEBG 2014, logistics for Sunday afternoon concert
    • 9:30-10:15 a.m.: PRESENTATION 9:  Clarke Buehling: Banjo Virtuoso, Music Collector, Educator, Take a Step Back in Time
    • 10:30-11:15 a.m.: PRESENTATION 10: Mentoring Breakout Session #2 (to be announced)
    • 11:30-12:30 p.m.: Lunch (provided for registered participants only)
    • 12:30-2:00 p.m.: Concert preparation
    • 2:00 p.m.: PUBLIC CONCERT in Dunker Church
    • 3:00 p.m.: good-byes

    Click Here to Register

     

     

  8. Jun
    21
    Saturday: 5:00 pm – 6:30 pm

     

     As part of the museum’s annual Early American Banjo Gathering, the Pry House will be hosting a public concert of authentic early American banjo music in the Pry Barn. Participants of the conference will perform various popular and entertaining numbers featuring the early banjo, once America’s most popular instrument. Seating is limited, we ask guest to consider bring their own chairs.
    The cost of this event is $5 per adult and $3 per child.

    For More information, contact Kyle Wichtendahl at kyle.wichtendahl@civilwarmed.org or 301-695-1864 ex. 1013.

  9. Jul
    3
    Thursday: 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm

    Join us every Thursday evening in July at the National Museum of Civil War Medicine for presentations on a variety of Civil War topics.  Local Author Joseph Collins will talk on the Battle of West Frederick, about which he has published a book by the same title. The Battle of West Frederick occurred on July 7, 1864. It was a precursor to the Battle of Monocacy, which occurred two days later to the east of town. As the advance elements of General Jubal Early’s Confederate Army descended Braddock Heights toward Frederick, they were intercepted by a mixed force of Union troops, resulting in an important, but often overlooked engagement. Admission is free.

    The Summer Evening Lecture Series are free and open to the public. 

  10. Jul
    5
    Saturday: 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
     
    Dr. John M. Rathgeb, MD will explore real cases from Union and Confederate Soldiers wounded during the Battle of Monocacy. The presentation will examine their injuries, course of treatment, and outcome and compare them with modern orthopedic practices. In commemoration of the 150th Battle of Monocacy, this program will be held at the Monocacy National Battlefield’s Gambrill Mill and will be a free lecture. 
  11. Jul
    5
    Saturday: 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

    Celebrate the 150th Anniversary of the Battle of Monocacy

    The National Museum of Civil War Medicine (NMCWM) will host Historic Happy Hours at Monocacy Crossing July 5-9 to commemorate the 150th Anniversary of the Battle of Monocacy. Visitors will have a chance to mingle with Museum staff while sharing historic stories about the Battle and Confederate  Gen. Jubal Early’s ransom of Frederick.  Enjoy Civil War-inspired libations, specially-priced select dishes, draft beers, domestic bottles and sparkling wine. Happy Hours vary depending on the day and are scheduled as follows:

     July 5 & 6 from 3 to 5 p.m.

    July 7 CLOSED

    July 8 & 9 from 4 to 7 p.m.

    A portion of the proceeds benefit the NMCWM.

  12. Jul
    6
    Sunday: 10:00 am – 11:00 am
    Dr. John M. Rathgeb, MD will explore real cases from Union and Confederate Soldiers wounded during the Battle of Monocacy. The presentation will examine their injuries, course of treatment, and outcome and compare them with modern orthopedic practices.
    In commemoration of the 150th Battle of Monocacy, this program will be held at the Monocacy National Battlefield’s Gambrill Mill and will be a free lecture. 
  13. Jul
    6
    Sunday: 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

    Celebrate the 150th Anniversary of the Battle of Monocacy

    The National Museum of Civil War Medicine (NMCWM) will host Historic Happy Hours at Monocacy Crossing July 5-9 to commemorate the 150th Anniversary of the Battle of Monocacy. Visitors will have a chance to mingle with Museum staff while sharing historic stories about the Battle and Confederate  Gen. Jubal Early’s ransom of Frederick.  Enjoy Civil War-inspired libations, specially-priced select dishes, draft beers, domestic bottles and sparkling wine. Happy Hours vary depending on the day and are scheduled as follows:

     July 5 & 6 from 3 to 5 p.m.

    July 7 CLOSED

    July 8 & 9 from 4 to 7 p.m.

    A portion of the proceeds benefit the NMCWM.

  14. Jul
    8
    Tuesday: 4:00 pm – 7:00 pm

    Celebrate the 150th Anniversary of the Battle of Monocacy

    The National Museum of Civil War Medicine (NMCWM) will host Historic Happy Hours at Monocacy Crossing July 5-9 to commemorate the 150th Anniversary of the Battle of Monocacy. Visitors will have a chance to mingle with Museum staff while sharing historic stories about the Battle and Confederate  Gen. Jubal Early’s ransom of Frederick.  Enjoy Civil War-inspired libations, specially-priced select dishes, draft beers, domestic bottles and sparkling wine. Happy Hours vary depending on the day and are scheduled as follows:

    July 5 & 6 from 3 to 5 p.m.

    July 7 CLOSED

    July 8 & 9 from 4 to 7 p.m.

    A portion of the proceeds benefit the NMCWM.

  15. Jul
    9
    Wednesday: 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm

    Journey Through Hallowed Ground
    Certified Tourism Ambassador Training
    July 9, 2014
    1:00 pm- 5:00 pm
    $49 Registration fee includes pre read materials
    Sign up today at http://www.ctanetwork.com/sign-up-for-a-class/.

    The Certified Tourism Ambassador (CTA) Program is a groundbreaking, nationwide certification program that serves to increase tourism by training and inspiring front-line hospitality employees and volunteers to work together to turn every visitor encounter into a positive experience. The Journey Through Hallowed Ground (JTHG) CTA Program goes well beyond basic customer service training; it:

    • Gives you the opportunity to build upon your knowledge of your community and the entire JTHG National Heritage Area;
    • Enhances your skills in serving customers;
    • Increases your awareness of information resources; and
    • Provides you with freebies & discounts to attractions, hotels & restaurants in the JTHG National Heritage Area

    For more information, contact Alyssa Poulin at  540.882.4929.  

  16. Jul
    9
    Wednesday: 4:00 pm – 7:00 pm

    Celebrate the 150th Anniversary of the Battle of Monocacy

    The National Museum of Civil War Medicine (NMCWM) will host Historic Happy Hours at Monocacy Crossing July 5-9 to commemorate the 150th Anniversary of the Battle of Monocacy. Visitors will have a chance to mingle with Museum staff while sharing historic stories about the Battle and Confederate  Gen. Jubal Early’s ransom of Frederick.  Enjoy Civil War-inspired libations, specially-priced select dishes, draft beers, domestic bottles and sparkling wine. Happy Hours vary depending on the day and are scheduled as follows:

    July 5 & 6 from 3 to 5 p.m.

    July 7 CLOSED

    July 8 & 9 from 4 to 7 p.m.

    A portion of the proceeds benefit the NMCWM.

  17. Jul
    10
    Thursday: 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm

    Join us every Thursday evening in July at the National Museum of Civil War Medicine for presentations on a variety of Civil War topics.  Local Author Bob O’Connor will talk on the subject of his latest book, James Edward Hanger. A Confederate veteran, Hanger was the first documented amputee of the Civil War. He would go on to form the J. E. Hanger Company, still one of the world’s leading manufacturers of prosthetic limbs. Admission is free.

    The Summer Evening Lecture Series are free and open to the public. 

  18. Jul
    11
    Friday: 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
    Raise a pint to Frederick at our summer Pints & the Past! On Friday, July 11, at 7:00 pm, the latest in our popular series will feature the National Museum of Civil War Medicine’s new “Bad Old Man Ransom Ale” and a discussion on the Confederacy’s third and final invasion of the North in the summer of 1864 and its impact on the citizens of Frederick County, led by NMCWM Programming Coordinator and Historian, Kyle Wichtendahl.
    This program will be held in the garden at the Historical Society of Frederick County’s headquarters at 24 East Church Street in Frederick. It is presented in partnership with the National Museum of Civil War Medicine and sponsored by Brewer’s Alley. Pints & the Past is a fun, relaxed program for anyone interested in getting together to chat about history. Guests are encouraged to arrive a few minutes early and grab a pint of “Ransom Ale,” the latest in a partnership between NMCWM and the Monocacy Bottling Company.
    For more information or to RSVP, visit our Facebook event page at http://on.fb.me/QxVHvy or contact Kristen M. Butler, Program Coordinator, at (301) 663-1188, ext. 105 or kbutler@frederickhistory.org.
  19. Jul
    17
    Thursday: 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm

    Join us every Thursday evening in July at the National Museum of Civil War Medicine for presentations on a variety of Civil War topics.  Tracy Evans, an Interpretive Ranger from Monocacy National Battlefield, will present on a topic of the Monocacy Campaign of 1864.

    The Summer Evening Lecture Series are free and open to the public.
  20. Jul
    19
    Saturday: 11:00 am – 5:00 pm

    This weekend long event filled with Civil War era toys and games for children of all ages is sure to be a great experience for the entire family. Children and parents alike can practice their penmanship and make take home crafts, such as rag-dolls and clay marbles. Children’s activities will begin at 11:00am and end at 5:00pm daily. This is a rain or shine event. 

  21. Jul
    24
    Thursday: 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm

    Join us every Thursday evening in July at the National Museum of Civil War Medicine for presentations on a variety of Civil War topics. Dr. Bob Slawson will talk about the remarkable service of a handful of skilled and dedicated women who served as medical doctors on both sides of the American Civil War, including the first and only woman to be awarded the Medal of Honor, Dr. Mary Walker. The Summer Evening Lecture Series are free and open to the public. 

  22. Jul
    31
    Thursday: 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm

    Join us every Thursday evening in July at the National Museum of Civil War Medicine for presentations on a variety of Civil War topics.  Dr. Gordon Dammann will relate how an obscure Army doctor, Jonathan Letterman, dramatically transformed the process of evacuating and treating combat casualties, forming the foundation of the modern emergency medical system. The Summer Evening Lecture Series are free and open to the public.

  23. Aug
    2
    Saturday: Aug 2 – Aug 3 (all day)

    Living History and Modern Military Encampment 

     

    Living historians portraying members of the Union Army’s Signal Corps will be encamped at the Pry House throughout the weekend. During the Battle of Antietam, the Pry Farm served as an important signal station for Gen. McClellan as he coordinated the army’s movements. Periodic demonstrations each day will showcase the equipment and operations of the Signal Corps during the Civil War. Interpreters will present the evolution of the U. S. Signal Corps, which began just before the Civil War and continues to play a vital role in the modern military. Visitors can try on uniforms and equipment and have a chance to send messages. 

     

  24. Aug
    2
    Saturday: 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
    Don Fischer
    Mr. Don Fischer will give a presentation on naval medicine and surgeons during the Civil War. Naval operations during the Civil War are generally overshadowed by the campaigns of armies on land, but maritime activities were no less important to the strategies and outcome of the war. Likewise, naval surgeons are often overlooked for their counterparts with Civil War armies, but Mr. Fischer will give an account of the service of shipboard doctors working for the health and welfare of fighting men at sea. Mr. Fischer will be dressed as U.S. Naval surgeon and have on hand a variety of medical tools and equipment.
  25. Aug
    28
    Thursday: 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm

    We would like to invite you to celebrate the grand opening of our newest exhibit When the War is Over… The Mental and Physical Legacy of the War at the National Museum of Civil War Medicine.

    Enjoy the newest release in the Civil War Beer Series, Bad Old Man Ransom Ale, along with refreshments provided by Wegmans in the Delaplaine-Randall Conference Room. 
     
    Our new exhibit shares the story of a soldier’s life in the aftermath of war. A Civil War veteran experienced mental and physical trials while returning to civilian life; an obstacle CURRENTLY faced by thousands of men and women today. In an effort to ease the veterans’ transition, social and government programs were created which are still operational.  The exhibit highlights Confederate soldier James Edward Hanger, the war’s first amputee, and his creation of his own prosthetic leg. The Hanger Company continues to produce prosthetics to this day.  While our exhibit focuses on Civil War veteran medical care, we bring to light many of the same issues faced by veterans of today’s wars.
     
    This exhibit was made possible through a grant from the Heart of the Civil War Heritage Area.
     
    We look forward to seeing you!
     
  26. Sep
    13
    Saturday: Sep 13 – Sep 14 (all day)

    The Pry House will host a Civil War medical living history program to commemorate the site’s role as a medical center during the Battle of Antietam. Members of the Blue and Gray Hospital Association will re-create a surgical hospital in the Pry Farm’s original threshing barn, which served as a Civil War field hospital. Surgeons, stewards, and nurses will give hands-on, interactive demonstrations of a variety of medical practices, including triage, battlefield surgery, and the making of medicines. Displays will showcase a variety of tools and equipment used by medical officers at the Battle of Antietam and throughout the Civil War. Programs are generally kid-friendly and designed for families to enjoy together.

  27. Sep
    18
    Thursday: 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm
    Join members of the Frederick County Civil War Roundtable for an evening lecture. The meetings are free and open to the public, they occur on the third Thursday of the month. For more information contact Jack Sheriff at jbsheriff1@comcast.net or visit http://frederickcountycivilwarrt.org/index.html.
  28. Oct
    2
    Thursday: Oct 2 – Oct 5 (all day)

    22nd Annual Conference on Civil War MedicineClick Here Register Now

    Atlanta, GA

    Double Tree by Hilton, Atlanta-Marietta

    2055 S Park Pl, Atlanta, GA 30339, TEL: 770-272-9441

    The National Museum of Civil War Medicine has assembled an impressive panel of prominent historians, authors and medical professionals to speak on a wide variety of topics at this year’s Conference.  Come learn something new at the Twenty-Second Annual Conference on Civil War Medicine, Friday-Sunday, Oct. 3-5, 2014, at the DoubleTree by Hilton, Atlanta–Marietta, Georgia.

    Highlights of the conference include seven unique lectures on Friday and Sunday, and a Saturday bus tour of the hospital sites in Marietta and a tour of the Kennesaw Mountain Battlefield. Also included are a Friday dinner and a Saturday evening happy hour.

    If you wish to register for conference events separately please call 301-695-1864, Ext. 1011 or e-mail tom.frezza@civilwarmed.org, availability is limited. All conference fees and lectures-only fees include a $50 non-refundable booking fee.  We are unable to offer refunds for cancellations made after September 1, 2014.  Please note registration closes Friday, September 26, 2014 at 5:00pm

    Registration Fees*

    All- Inclusive

    NMCWM Members         $300

    General Adult                   $355

    À la carte   (Limited Availability)

    Friday & Sunday Lectures $240

    Friday Dinner Guest             $65

    Atlanta Bus Tour                $ 55

    Saturday Happy Hour         $ 55

    *Registration Fees increase September 15, 2013

     

    Conference Lecture Schedule

     

    Friday, October 3, 1:15 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.

     

    Saint Simon’s Island Antebellum Plantations: The Role of the Plantation Mistress and Medical Care of the African Slaves

    Paulette Snoby, RN

                This topic is important to this forum since it includes a cultural discussion of Antebellum plantation architecture, the role of the plantation mistress as care-giver of the slaves in the Old South and several of the diseases specific to slaves dwelling in the Georgia rice plantations. The masters and their sons of these plantations participated in the Confederacy, their homes were occupied and many destroyed by Union troops, and many slaves found their freedom with the arrival of those troops. The discussion will include a description of the two slave hospitals that were known during this time period. Their ruins have been photographed and will be shown.  Names of those plantation mistresses who we know cared for their slaves will be detailed and supported with bibliographical information.

     

    Civil War Medicine–the Hollywood Version

    Dr. Gordon Dammann, D.D.S.

                A controversy that exists even today is: “Was the movie as good as the book? (and vice versa).”  We can take this element of debate into Civil War medicine. Do movies tell a true story of the medical practices during the war? We will discuss six movies and the impact on the viewer’s impression of medical practices of the time. We will analyze the good, the bad, and the ugly as depicted, and their relevance to the true story of medicine.

     

    Blood Transfusion and Intravenous Fluid in the Civil War Era

    Dr. Robert Slawson

                Trauma and shock were major killers during the American Civil War and treatment methods were inadequate. They would remain so for another 50 years. By World War II, it would be realized that the introduction of fluids and of blood into the circulatory system could result in saving innumerable lives. Sadly, this knowledge and these techniques were not present during the Civil War. However, although seldom realized, much scientific work had been done in regard to these practices, and basic theories and processes had been developed. This presentation tells a little-known story of the early work in the field of blood transfusion and intravenous saline injection.

     

    Smallpox and Control in the Civil War South: The New Science of Bacteriology and the Rise of Public Health Practice 

    Shauna Devine

                Smallpox was the most political of the public health diseases in the nineteenth century—epidemics were routinely blamed on the failures of the physician, the failure of the public to be vaccinated, or the propaganda of the anti-vaccinationists. By 1861, American physicians understood that smallpox was contagious; however, they did not understand the process of contagion or the immunizing process. Nevertheless, both the Union and Confederate medical departments had compulsory vaccination policies for all soldiers. This talk will examine the vaccination crisis that took shape during the American Civil War, and increased in the 1870s as smallpox became epidemic once again, owing to the susceptibility of the new immigrant population.

     

     

    Saturday, October 4, 8:45 a.m. to 5:45 p.m.

    Bus tour of the hospital sites in Marietta and a tour of the Kennesaw Mountain Battlefield, lunch on your own in Marietta.

                 

    Sunday, October 5, 8 a.m. to Noon

     

    “To Encourage and Build Up”: The General Duties and Place of the Civil War Chaplain in Regiment and Hospital

    George Munkenbeck

                The Civil War demonstrated the need for an American military chaplaincy.  In hospitals, on large posts and in the field, these soldiers of God lived St. Paul’s advice to the Thessalonians to “Encourage and Build up.” They worked hard and often took great risks to provide comfort to those who were their charges. With command support they served God and Country and laid down a tradition of service that still inspires. This program will emphasize their service in support of the medical personnel. This is not a religious program, but rather a look at the chaplaincy.

    Clothing the Union Army

    Mavis Slawson

                Clothing all of the hundreds of thousands of men who became volunteers in the Union Army during the Civil War required considerable expertise and experience. After a shaky start in the process, the Quartermaster Corps worked diligently to provide uniforms. The mechanism by which this was accomplished is poorly understood by most people. This presentation will take the mystery out of the process and show how the Quartermaster Corps under Montgomery Meigs managed to provide a reasonably well-clothed army for the war.  

     

    Civil War Ballistics

    George Wunderlich

                In 2005, a series of ballistics studies were begun for the History Channel. Those studies found that, in addition to the injuries caused by permanent and temporary cavitation caused by the flight of the bullet, other factors may have existed that increased risks of infection and increased mortality and morbidity by the introduction of foreign matter into the wound. This lecture will look at those factors in a series of calibrated ballistic gel studies looking at ballistic lubricants, uniform and accoutrement fragments and uniform “dirt” as possible risk factors in Civil War bullet wounds. 

  29. Oct
    16
    Thursday: 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm
    Join members of the Frederick County Civil War Roundtable and the Historical Society of Frederick County for an evening lecture by Craig L. Symonds, Professor Emeritus at the US Naval Academy and renowned naval historian, at the Delaplaine Visual Arts Center.
     
    Please note: This meeting will NOT be held at the National Museum of Civil War Meeting.

     

    FCCWRT meetings are free and open to the public. They occur on the third Thursday of the month at the National Museum of Civil War Medicine. For more information contact Jack Sheriff at jbsheriff1@comcast.net or visit http://frederickcountycivilwarrt.org/index.html.
  30. Oct
    23
    Thursday: 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm

    The Letterman Award was established to celebrate MAJ Jonathan Letterman’s work as Medical Director of the Army of the Potomac.  In honor of his visionary work, the National Museum of Civil War Medicine has established the annual Letterman Award to recognize an individual or entity that has made an outstanding contribution to improving medical processes and patient outcomes. This is a ticketed event that requires pre-registration.For more information, please contact April Dietrich at letterman@civilwarmed.org or call 301-695-1864, ext. 1009Click Here Register Now