Articles

Pry House Hosts Unprecedented Events for 150th Commemoration

Posted on:

For Immediate Release: 150th Anniversary Weekend Commemoration of the Battle of Antietam Pry House Field Hospital Museum National Museum of Civil War Medicine  Civil War Medicine…it’s not what you think. Union Army Headquarters During the Battle of Antietam, the Pry House served as headquarters for General George B. McClellan and the Union Army. One hundred fifty years later, the Pry Farm will once again be under occupation as living historians on the lawn and around the house will portray members of the Union Army headquarters. They will be joined by the elite 5thNY Regiment, who will serve as camp guards…

Read More »

Read More...

Twentieth Annual Conference on Civil War Medicine Intinerary Announced

Posted on:

Twentieth Annual Conference on Civil War Medicine Commemorating the 150th Anniversary of the Battle of Antietam October 5-7, 2012 Pre-Conference Event, October 4, 2012 Bus Tour of the Hospital Sites of the Antietam Battlefield Ramada Plaza Hotel, Hagerstown, MD Civil War Medicine…it’s not what you think!  CLICK HERE TO REGISTER NOW! Come learn the facts at the Twentieth Annual Conference on Civil War Medicine, Friday-Sunday, Oct. 5-7, 2012, at the Ramada Plaza Hotel, Hagerstown, MD.  The National Museum of Civil War Medicine has assembled an impressive panel of prominent historians, authors, and medical professionals speaking on a wide variety of topics…

Read More »

Read More...

Medical Innovators Honored as Heroes and Pioneers

Posted on:

Contact: April DietrichInstitutional Advancement and Communicationcommunication@civilwarmed.org301-695-1864October 31, 2011 For Immediate Release: Medical Innovators Honored as Heroes and Pioneers The National Museums of Civil War Medicine will honor the innovative work of the Military Amputee Research Program (MARP) and the leadership of COL Alexander Stojadinovic, MD, FACS at a Gala Dinner on Thursday, October 27, 2011 at Musket Ridge Golf Course in Myersville, MD. The Surgeon General of the Army and Commander of the U.S. Army Medical Command Lt. Gen. Eric B. Schoomaker offered the keynote address at this year’s Maj Jonathan Letterman Award for Medical Excellence Gala Dinner. Lieutenant General…

Read More »

Read More...

National Museum of Civil War Medicine to Participate in Blue Star Museums

Posted on:

NATIONAL MUSEUM OF CIVIL WAR MEDICINE TO PARTICIPATE IN BLUE STAR MUSEUMS Today The National Museum of Civil War Medicine (NMCWM) announces the launch of Blue Star Museums, a partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts, Blue Star Families, and more than 1,300 museums across America to offer free admission to all active duty military personnel and their families from Memorial Day through Labor Day 2011. The complete list of participating museums is available at www.arts.gov/bluestarmuseums. The NMCWM is one of more than 1,300 museums across America to offer free admission to military personnel and their families this summer….

Read More »

Read More...

Nineteenth Annual Conference on Civil War Medicine: Civil War Medicine, It’s Not What You Think

Posted on:

Nineteenth Annual Conference on Civil War Medicine Civil War Medicine…it’s not what you think. Come learn the facts at the Nineteenth Annual Conference on Civil War Medicine Friday-Sunday, Sept. 30, Oct. 1-2, 2011, at the Sheraton Baltimore North Hotel in Towson, MD. A pre-conference event is scheduled for Thursday, September 29. The NMCWM has assembled an impressive panel of prominent historians, authors, and medical professionals speaking on a wide variety of topics relating to Civil War medicine.   Lecture topics and speakers are as follows:   Aspects of the Epidemiology of Gastrointestinal Disease in the Civil War, Joseph I. Berman, M.D.; The…

Read More »

Read More...

Fort Detrick leaders seek lessons from Harpers Ferry

Posted on:

By Megan Eckstein, Frederick News Post, March 24, 2011 Step back in time 150 years, and Harpers Ferry was the equivalent of today’s Fort Detrick. Instead of housing pivotal biodefense assets, it housed a major federal arsenal. The town centered on government workers and the contractors and ancillary businesses that followed. The town was strategically located between two major transportation routes — the Shenandoah and Potomac rivers. Fort Detrick, by comparison, is between I-270 and I-70. But a series of historic decisions caused Harpers Ferry to die out as a town and as a relevant government campus. Facing a wave…

Read More »

Read More...

National Museum of Civil War Medicine Honors African Americans that served in the Civil War

Posted on:

For Immediate Release:October 14, 2010Contact: Adele Air(301) 695-1864education@civilwarmed.org                                                                         National Museum of Civil War Medicine Honors African Americans that served in the Civil WarWith Lecture and New ExhibitBinding Wounds, Pushing Boundaries: African Americans in Civil War Medicine Frederick, MD – The National Museum of Civil War Medicine honors the history of the African Americans that served in the American Civil War by mounting its latest exhibit:  Binding Wounds, Pushing Boundaries: African Americans in Civil War Medicine.  The exhibit developed and produced by the National Library of Medicine with research assistance from the Historical Society of Washington, DC opens at the…

Read More »

Read More...

National Museum of Civil War Medicine to open New Museum in Downtown DC

Posted on:

November 24, 2010 For Immediate Release: National Museum of Civil War Medicine to open New Museum in Downtown DC On Thursday, November 4, Clara Barton’s Missing Soldiers Office located at 437 7th Street, Washington, DC, was opened to the public for an event hosted by the National Museum of Civil War Medicine (NMCWM), in coordination with Destination DC and the U.S. General Services Administration (GSA). The third floor where Clara Barton had her office and living quarters has been essentially untouched since the time the doors were closed in 1875 until re-discovered 1997.  Since then, GSA has been in search…

Read More »

Read More...

White middle and upper class women were the majority component of the hospital relief workforce North and South.

Posted on:

Patriotism aside the majority of women serving in union and confederate hospitals were working classes, and they were paid for their work as cooks, laundresses, matrons, waitresses, seamstresses, chambermaids, and the occasional nurse.  In Southern hospitals alone at least 20% (if not more) of the hospital personnel were slaves hired out by their owners to care for the wounded.  Typically in the North and South literate, well-connected women who entered service were referred to as nurses while working class women lacking literacy were given less impressive job tittles.  Certainly, working class women felt compassion for the ill and wounded, but…

Read More »

Read More...

Civil War Tourism Just Got Easier

Posted on:

Civil War tourism just got easierOriginally published September 15, 2010 By Karen Gardner News-Post Staff  SHARPSBURG — A public-private partnership formed on the eve of the 150th anniversary of the start of the Civil War is aimed at bringing some of the 1.5 million annual visitors to Antietam National Battlefield to Civil War sites in Frederick County.Civil War historical attractions don’t start and stop with the area’s battlefields. As the region gets ready to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the battles of South Mountain, Antietam and Monocacy starting in 2012, the new Heart of the Civil War Heritage Area Exhibit…

Read More »

Read More...